Search Results For -athens

Going to TBEX Athens? Here’s a (sort of) local guide
Where to eat like a local: Food in Athens
5+1 museums not to miss on your holidays to Greece
10 of the best cultural monuments in Europe Part 1
Opa! The top 5 cultural holidays in Greece
Top 30 Restaurants in Greece
Lesson Learned: Three days is not enough for Istanbul
Amazing Days Out: Granada’s Alhambra Palace
Purple Tips: Alonnisos, a secret Greek Island
Purple 10 really weird museums

Going to TBEX Athens? Here’s a (sort of) local guide

I was so happy to hear that TBEX, the travel blog exchange will be held in Athens, Greece in 2014. There’s a simple reason for this. Although I’m not from here, it’s been my home for the past three and a bit years. In that time I’ve come to feel very proud of Athens: it’s lively and vibrant, friendly and fun, parties go on all night, food is incredible and so cheap and is nothing like what you see on tv… it’s much more than that. Everyone knows about the sites like Anafiotika, The Acropolis, and Plaka. All incredible sites that I never get tired of… but I wanted to share some practical local knowledge – when you first arrive somewhere, where should you eat, drink or dance? This list is a bit nightlife heavy and I could have kept writing all day – but seriously, who would be still going on page 55? If you’ve got any other questions about local stuff to do or see during TBEX Athens, please feel free to get in touch, I’ll do my best to help out.

11390570636_1d382b8a4a_zImage via @ flickr

Sunset Views

Head for the Acropolis, but instead of turning right up to the Parthenon, turn left and watch out for a metal staircase that leads you up to the open rocks opposite. A free and lovely place to soak up a glorious sunset behind the ancient temple. Known to locals or me certainly) as the slippery rocks, it’s best to wear good shoes up there. There are also lots of bars with great views in Athens, I’ve been to many of them. If you’re in Monastiraki avoid A for Athens. The overpriced drinks and rude staff don’t help you appreciate the view too much. Instead, head for the roof of the AthenStyle hostel for decent value drinks and a panoramic terrace or the cool surrounds of a 6th floor roof bar called Sole e Luna in a hotel in Neos Kosmos, where you can find a sunset to rival the Monastiraki bars and enjoy an expertly made Mojito.

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Where to eat like a local: Food in Athens

In Athens, the Greek capital it would be really difficult to find yourself starving! Souvlaki outlets are all over the city. Souvlaki is the term for what is basically the Greek equivalent to a burger, quick to eat, tasty and really cheap. It’s usually made of meat, chicken or pork, cooked on a skewer and put into a pitta bread with onion, tzatziki and tomato.

However, as a tourist you’ll probably be wandering around the centre. So, here are some tips for an ultimate souvlaki experience in Athens city, whether you’re staying a few days or heading for the beautiful islands.

Some of the most charming areas in downtown Athens are undoubtedly Plaka, Monastiraki and Thissio. Apart from the many archaeological sites, there is also a heap of local restaurants and spots serving various versions of the infamous Greek souvlaki. But, take our advice and have a delicious meal in one of the following places. We bet that you’ll be asking for more food in Athens before the end of your holiday.

Click here to read part one, where to eat like a local, Lisbon edition.

Try Thanassis in Monastiraki and taste the best traditional kebab in town, as this is its one and only specialty. What’s more prices are so low that you’ll be coming back again and again to saturate your cravings. For the traditional gyros, you can’t get much better than Bairaktaris, slap, bang in the middle of Monastiraki Square. Huge portions and great value will set you up for a great night out.

Kavouras in the nearby neighbourhood of Exarcheia is all about the taste. Simple food – no refinement here. And the neighbourhood, a kind of alternative place where people gather is really worth a look.


Another great choice is Nikitas in Psyrri, just across from Monastiraki square, is a good spot for an authentic and tasty lunchtime treat. This place has been serving since 1967, so they must be doing something right. Plata Iroon in the same area is also a firm local favourite.

For those savouring the Greek sun and sea on the shores of Attica, Zachos in Varkiza is also a worthwhile choice. This place serves a wide range of dishes, such as pork or chicken souvlaki, gyros (sliced pork meat, tomato, onion, and tzatziki sauce, wrapped in pita bread), even traditional burgers. You choose!

5+1 museums not to miss on your holidays to Greece

holidays to Greece

Holidays to Greece are not only about the sun sea and sand, as the land of the gods also has a vibrant culture and impressive history stretching back to more than 3800 years. As such, Greece happens to be the country with the most archaeological museums per capita in the world which are also well-endowed with some of the most impressive artefacts. Wherever you book you might have a museum nearby so this is a prime opportunity to indulge and learn more about the intriguing ancient history that gave birth to the modern western civilization.

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10 of the best cultural monuments in Europe Part 1

European Monuments

Europe has long been amongst the most culturally diverse continents, bustling with history and culture. As a result, each corner has its own cultural monument to show. From the imposing Neuschweinstein castle to the famous leaning tower of Pisa, the following sights bear a significant history and their appearance is definitely something to match!

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Opa! The top 5 cultural holidays in Greece

Cultural Holidays in Greece

Holidays in Greece are always welcome if you are up for some sunshine, food, culture and good times overall. Its great weather and long history along with a wide variety of yearly occasions make cultural holidays in Greece a great opportunity to visit and learn more about its customs and intriguing heritage.

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Top 30 Restaurants in Greece

Culinary experiences - Best restaurants in Greece Images via @athinorama

Wondering what’s the best place to eat during your holidays in Greece? We are more than excited to present you the highlights of the most stunning Greek gastronomy ceremony, ”Golden Chef’s Hat”, held in Athens on Monday April 20th in the Ballroom of the hotel “Grande Bretagne”.  Foreign journalists and ministers, as well as Greek tourism professionals shared their excitement for culinary experiences celebrating the best restaurants in Greece. As gastronomy is amongst the most authentic cultural elements of Greece, the ”Golden Chef’s Hat” awards, for the first time in 22 years, brought not one but two restaurants to the top of the Greek culinary scene. Read More

Lesson Learned: Three days is not enough for Istanbul

It turns out March in Istanbul is the perfect time to visit. Actually, scratch that, I would say anytime is the perfect time to go. No wonder it’s been named the best destination to visit in 2014. Living in Athens, it was an easy trip for me and my friend across the Aegean for three days of exploring in the vast (trust me, it’s huge) sprawling Turkish City.

2014-03-21 16.32.00

Ok, i’ll throw my hands up and say it was kind of a surprise to realise just how huge the city is. It’s spread across both sides of the Bosphorus. Since we had such a short time, we fancied seeing the obvious ones, this was a taster really, but here’s our highlights:

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Amazing Days Out: Granada’s Alhambra Palace

Amazing Days Out: Granada’s Alhambra Palace

If you’re holidaying in Spain, particularly Andalusia or anywhere nearby, you’ll be wanting to check out the incredible Alhambra Palace. It is easily one of the most popular tourist attractions in Europe, certainly the most famous in Spain and the town of Granada offers a little shelter from the punishing summer heat of Seville or Cordoba, and is only a couple of hours from Malaga. The two parts of the complex, the Alhambra and Albaycin are seated on two opposite hills and showcase medieval Granada at its most magnificent.


Image via @ Cromeo

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Purple Tips: Alonnisos, a secret Greek Island

Discover a traditional Greek Island where life is simpler, discover Alonnisos with blogger Rebecca Hall.


Located in the North Sporades, Alonnisos takes eight hours from Athens: three hours by coach to the port at Agios Konstantinos, then five hours by ferry via Skiathos and Skopelos. But as soon as I stepped off the ferry and took in my surroundings, I knew it was worth it.

“Ela!” an elderly lady waved to me from the portside. She was here to collect and drive me up the mountain to her accommodation. “Me lene Artemis.” Artemis ran a small guesthouse, just outside of the main harbour town of Patitiri. After unpacking my things I flopped onto the bed, rolled onto my side, noting I had a gorgeous view of the harbour and sea right from my window.


I must have dozed off. A high pitch screeching (several, actually) greeted my ears. They were the cicadas, complaining in the afternoon heat—by rubbing their legs together, it creates that noise you often hear in the summer in Greece…it cools them down.

A wander back down to the town led me past island jewellery shops; old ladies in black chatting on the steps, stopping to smile as I passed. The bougainvillea wended its way around a white archway…the blues of the door, white and purples looked striking against the equally blue sky. I’m in Greece I remember thinking. Eating fresh octopus in the taverna, I looked down at the beach—people still swimming at 7:30pm. I made plans for the rest of my stay.

Boat trip

Patitiri cove
During my say, I went on a boat trip around the Marine Park that surrounds Alonisos—home to the quiet and seldom seen Monk Seals. No, I didn’t spot any, but was lucky enough to spot dolphins, go to various hidden coves, the Blue Cave—swim from the boat and eat in the gorgeous harbour town of Steni Vala.


Houses abandoned in the Chora after the 1965 earthquake
The Chora (pronounced ‘hora’) is the old village of Alonissos, located in the hills. Much of the village was destroyed in the 1965 earthquake, prompting the locals to abandon their houses and move to Patitiri. What’s left is an architectural mix of old properties and beautifully restored holiday homes. Sitting in the Square sipping coffee, views out to the coast on both sides of me, I kicked back and listened to live Greek music, watched the kids running around at 10pm (no need for bedtime rules here) and allowed the atmosphere to embrace me.

Bio: Bex is an unconventional British lass with a degree in International Relations. She’s the wrong side of 35 and only just the right side of 40 and when she’s not off gallivanting around the high seas and writing about it, she’s based in the unconventional country of Greece ( a country that suits her nature very well! ). She’s travelled to, lived and taught English in various places around the globe. She describes herself as a jack of all trades: she’s worked at LHR airport—dealing with high profile passengers, organised people’s lives through her role as P.A. to various individuals and returned to full time education in her early 30’s. All experiences have helped to shape who she is today. Follow Bex on her site, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest.

Purple 10 really weird museums

A spy museum, all you’ve ever wanted to know about toilets and real life samples from Big Foot, we’ve got 10 really weird museums from around the world for your pleasure.

museum mosaic 1

  1. Want to become a spy? Actually, can we just ask, who doesn’t? Well, now you can, for a day anyway, at the International Spy Museum in Washington DC, USA. We’re talking gadgets, code breaking and generally being a bit James Bond as you learn about the history of secret agents and get to grips with a life of espionage.
  2. Iceland’s Phallological Museum in Reykjavik, is as the name suggests all about biology and takes it very seriously too. It is home to a collection of more than 215 penis specimens from various mammals found in the wild all over the island including a walrus, a rogue polar bear, a whale. There are also four examples from humans, but we didn’t ask where they came from.
  3. We always hear of the priceless art found in countless cities throughout the world, but what about the bad stuff? The Museum of Bad Art in Boston claims to be the only one of its kind in the world. Featuring art that’s ‘too bad to be ignored’ it features plenty of paintings of dodgy blue people, symbols that don’t mean much and some weird uses of nudity.
  4. For all you’ve ever wanted to know about the humble toilet, you could do worse than the International Museum of Toilets in New Delhi. The curators tell us: ‘the toilet is a part of the history of human hygiene which is a critical chapter in the growth of civilisation.’
  5. Athens is well known for its museums filled with thousands of years of artefacts that document the birthplace of science and democracy. We like the Tactual Museum, where you’re actively encouraged to touch everything. There are all kinds of replicas, statues and frescoes that you can get up close and personal with.
  6. The Hair Museum of Avanos in Cappadocia, Turkey is a fairly simple idea, but definitely one of the most bizarre things you’ll see. In a room under an unassuming pottery shop, you’ll find caves covered with a collection of over 16,000 locks of hair from women from all over the world. It’s free to enter, and women can leave a lock of their own if they want.
  7. For the latest information and conjecture on the likes of Big Foot, the Montauk Monster, or the Abominable Snowman, then the Cryptozoology Museum, in Portland, USA is a good place to start. It claims to have ‘actual samples’ of hair and unique pieces of evidence from mythical creatures from all over the world.
  8. Your green fingers will start tingling when you hear about the British Lawnmower Museum. As you would expect, it’s dedicated to all things grass cutting and is home to specialised gardening machines, vintage lawnmowers and all manner of parts and conservation materials from all over the world. A truly British experience.
  9. If you’ve got a weak stomach, it might be best to skip the Paris Sewer Museum. You’re guided through the tunnels and pummelled by historical and factual information about the famous underground areas that have featured in French literature including Les Miserables and Phantom Of The Opera.
  10. Love chips? So do we and so do the Belgians apparently, if the Friet Museum is anything to go by. The ground floor offers a 10,000 year potted history of the humble spud and it’s development into the tasty chip we know and love today.

You should read… Amazing Days Out: Pig Museum Stuttgart

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